Displaying 21 - 25 of 34103

Jacques W. Cremer

Howard Wesley Johnson is President Emeritus and former Chairman of the Corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

  • Holding the Center

    Holding the Center

    Memoirs of a Life in Higher Education

    Jacques W. Cremer

    Memoir of a former MIT President, as well as professor, corporate director, and advisor to American government agencies and to museums and foundations.

    Howard Wesley Johnson has been associated with MIT for more than forty years and been a major influence on the modernization and expansion of many of its programs. He will be most remembered as a management educator and as MIT's president during the turbulent late 1960s and early 1970s. The title of his memoirs reflects his central, usually lonely position in those days, trying to hold together an institution often torn apart by the turmoil of the times. Johnson was more successful at navigating the minefields on campus than were many other college and university presidents, perhaps because he was always willing to listen to both sides and because his values were in the right place—against the war in Vietnam, in favor of increased participation in the university by women and minorities, and concerned about environmental issues. As a professor and administrator at MIT, a corporate director, and an advisor to American government agencies and to museums and foundations, Johnson consistently sought both to understand and to apply the principles of good management.

    • Hardcover $55.00
    • Paperback $30.00

Contributor

  • The Social Organization of Electric Power Supply in Modern Societies

    Philip Sporn

    For many years Philip Sporn has been a leader in the electric power industry. Not only has he built his company into the largest investor-owned electric utility in the world, but for several decades he also spearheaded practically every major technical development in the industry. In this book he examines the basic question of public versus private power. The increasing public acceptance of the social aspects of electric power supply raises doubts about the likelihood of maintaining in the future the present division between private and public power. He notes the social, technical, and economic difficulties that confront both sectors and indicates several possible courses for the future.

    The world's first commercial electric power facility – the Pearl Street Station in New York City – began service in 1882 with a modest load of approximately 400 lamps, each taking about 83 watts and constituting an electric power industry faces an unprecedented demand for electric power industry faces an unprecedented demand for electric energy and an undiminished future growth. The book begins by tracing the development of U.S. public power to “its present strong minority position (23%)” over a period of half a century and discusses the organization of electric power supply in England, France, Mexico, Russia, Italy, and Sweden. The technical competence and performance of public and private power are then examined, and the performance of power systems under different social organizations set up to protect the national interest is analyzed. The book concludes by indicating specific problems that will be faced in the future by the utilities industry.

    One of the book's principal concerns is to cut through the myths that have long surrounded public power – the mistaken linking of “public power” with “the public interest,” and the serious limitations that are placed on initiative and imagination in this sector. Mr. Sporn's analysis of capital and tax costs is particularly explosive and suggests a more rational means of measuring true costs than has been available up to now.

    While the book makes a strong case for continuation of private ownership and management of power supply facilities, it also indicates the past and present failings of private power. What the utility industry sorely needs, Mr. Sporn concludes, is better, more creative and responsive management: “Too many of the managers of our utility enterprise have been raised by and large in a background of law, or accounting, or economics. Technical imagination is not part of their training. Social responsibility and ethics are more or less foreign concepts—at least they would be treated as improper for integration into the management decision process.” While no single form of social organization can “magically eliminate” all the problems of the electric power industry, Mr. Sporn points hopefully to the Swedish system which has successfully integrated both private and public power, keeping alive “ethical and real competition” between the sectors.

    • Hardcover $11.00

Donald Leslie Johnson

Donald Johnson is Adjunct Professor in the School of Art, Architecture, and Design at the University of South Australia.

  • Frank Lloyd Wright versus America

    Frank Lloyd Wright versus America

    The 1930s

    Donald Leslie Johnson

    For his critics and biographers, the 1930s have always been the most challenging period of Frank Lloyd Wright's career. This fresh account by Donald Johnson, the first to make use of the architect's long-inaccessible archives at Taliesin West, is also the first to provide a balanced evaluation of Wright in the 1930s. It separates Wright's design activities from his self-promotion and places his philosophy of individualism within the context of the times.

    • Hardcover $45.00
    • Paperback $42.00

John M. Meyer

John M. Meyer is Professor in the Department of Politics and a Faculty Member in Environmental Studies and the Environment and Community Graduate Program at Humboldt State University. He is the author of Political Nature: Environmentalism and the Interpretation of Western Thought and the coeditor of The Environmental Politics of Sacrifice (both published by the MIT Press).

  • Engaging the Everyday

    Engaging the Everyday

    Environmental Social Criticism and the Resonance Dilemma

    John M. Meyer

    An argument that environmental challenges will only resonate with citizens of affluent postindustrial countries if sustainability concerns emerge from everyday practices.

    Far-reaching efforts to address environmental issues rarely seem to resonate with citizens of the United States or other wealthy postindustrial societies. In Engaging the Everyday, John Meyer considers this impediment to action on environmental problems—which he terms “the resonance dilemma”—and argues that an environmental agenda that emerges from everyday concerns would resonate more deeply with ordinary citizens. Meyer explores the contours of this alternative, theorizing both obstacles and opportunities and then considering it in terms of three everyday areas of material practice: land use, transportation by automobile, and home dwelling.

    Adopting the stance of an “inside critic” (neither detached theorist nor narrow policy advocate), and taking an approach that he calls “contested materiality,” Meyer draws on a variety of theoretical perspectives to construct a framework for understanding material practices. He reimagines each of the three material practices in terms of a political idea: for land, property; for automobiles, freedom; and for homes, citizenship. His innovative analysis offers a grounded basis for reshaping our talk about political concepts and values.

    • Hardcover $51.00
    • Paperback $30.00
  • The Environmental Politics of Sacrifice

    The Environmental Politics of Sacrifice

    Michael Maniates and John M. Meyer

    An argument that the idea of sacrifice, with all its political baggage, opens new paths to environmental sustainability.

    The idea of sacrifice is the unspoken issue of environmental politics. Politicians, the media, and many environmentalists assume that well-off populations won't make sacrifices now for future environmental benefits and won't change their patterns and perceptions of consumption to make ecological room for the world's three billion or so poor eager to improve their standard of living. The Environmental Politics of Sacrifice challenges these assumptions, arguing that they limit our policy options, weaken our ability to imagine bold action for change, and blind us to the ways sacrifice already figures in everyday life. The concept of sacrifice has been curiously unexamined in both activist and academic conversations about environmental politics, and this book is the first to confront it directly. The chapters bring a variety of disciplinary perspectives to the topic. Contributors offer alternatives to the conventional wisdom on sacrifice; identify connections between sacrifice and human fulfillment in everyday life, finding such concrete examples as parents' sacrifices in raising children, religious practice, artists' pursuit of their art, and soldiers and policemen who risk their lives to do their jobs; and examine particular policies and practices that shape our understanding of environmental problems, including the carbon tax, incentives for cyclists, and the perils of green consumption. The Environmental Politics of Sacrifice puts “sacrifice” firmly into the conversation about effective environmental politics and policies, insisting that activists and scholars do more than change the subject when the idea is introduced.

    ContributorsPeter Cannavò, Shane Gunster, Cheryl Hall, Karen Litfin, Michael Maniates, John M. Meyer, Simon Nicholson, Anna Peterson, Thomas Princen, Sudhir Chella Rajan, Paul Wapner, Justin Williams

    • Hardcover $50.00
    • Paperback $26.00
  • Political Nature

    Political Nature

    Environmentalism and the Interpretation of Western Thought

    John M. Meyer

    Concern over environmental problems is prompting us to reexamine established thinking about society and politics. The challenge is to find a way for the public's concern for the environment to become more integral to social, economic, and political decision making. Two interpretations have dominated Western portrayals of the nature-politics relationship, what John Meyer calls the dualist and the derivative. The dualist account holds that politics—and human culture in general—is completely separate from nature. The derivative account views Western political thought as derived from conceptions of nature, whether Aristotelian teleology, the clocklike mechanism of early modern science, or Darwinian selection. Meyer examines the nature-politics relationship in the writings of two of its most pivotal theorists, Aristotle and Thomas Hobbes, and of contemporary environmentalist thinkers. He concludes that we must overcome the limitations of both the dualist and the derivative interpretations if we are to understand the relationship between nature and politics.

    Human thought and action, says Meyer, should be considered neither superior nor subservient to the nonhuman natural world, but interdependent with it. In the final chapter, he shows how struggles over toxic waste dumps in poor neighborhoods, land use in the American West, and rainforest protection in the Amazon illustrate this relationship and point toward an environmental politics that recognizes the experience of place as central.

    • Hardcover $62.50
    • Paperback $30.00

Contributor

  • Engaging Nature

    Engaging Nature

    Environmentalism and the Political Theory Canon

    Peter F. Cannavò and Joseph H. Lane, Jr.

    Essays that put noted political thinkers of the past—including Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Wollstonecraft, Marx, and Confucius—in dialogue with current environmental political theory.

    Contemporary environmental political theory considers the implications of the environmental crisis for such political concepts as rights, citizenship, justice, democracy, the state, race, class, and gender. As the field has matured, scholars have begun to explore connections between Green Theory and such canonical political thinkers as Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, and Marx. The essays in this volume put important figures from the political theory canon in dialogue with current environmental political theory. It is the first comprehensive volume to bring the insights of Green Theory to bear in reinterpreting these canonical theorists.

    Individual essays cover such classical figures in Western thought as Aristotle, Hume, Rousseau, Mill, and Burke, but they also depart from the traditional canon to consider Mary Wollstonecraft, W. E. B. Du Bois, Hannah Arendt, and Confucius. Engaging and accessible, the essays also offer original and innovative interpretations that often challenge standard readings of these thinkers. In examining and explicating how these great thinkers of the past viewed the natural world and our relationship with nature, the essays also illuminate our current environmental predicament.

    Essays onPlato • Aristotle • Niccolò Machiavelli • Thomas Hobbes • John Locke • David Hume • Jean-Jacques Rousseau • Edmund Burke • Mary Wollstonecraft • John Stuart Mill • Karl Marx • W. E. B. Du Bois • Martin Heidegger • Hannah Arendt • Confucius

    ContributorsSheryl D. Breen, W. Scott Cameron, Peter F. Cannavò, Joel Jay Kassiola, Joseph H. Lane Jr. Timothy W. Luke, John M. Meyer, Özgüç Orhan, Barbara K. Seeber, Francisco Seijo, Kimberly K. Smith, Piers H. G. Stephens, Zev Trachtenberg, Andrew Valls, Harlan Wilson

    • Hardcover $59.00
    • Paperback $35.00

Jeffrey M. Wooldridge

Jeffrey M. Wooldridge is University Distinguished Professor of Economics at Michigan State University and a Fellow of the Econometric Society.

  • Student's Solutions Manual and Supplementary Materials for Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, Second Edition

    Student's Solutions Manual and Supplementary Materials for Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, Second Edition

    Jeffrey M. Wooldridge

    This is the essential companion to the second edition of Jeffrey Wooldridge's widely used graduate econometrics text. The text provides an intuitive but rigorous treatment of two state-of-the-art methods used in contemporary microeconomic research. The numerous end-of-chapter exercises are an important component of the book, encouraging the student to use and extend the analytic methods presented in the book. This manual contains advice for answering selected problems, new examples, and supplementary materials designed by the author, which work together to enhance the benefits of the text. Users of the textbook will find the manual a necessary adjunct to the book.

    • Paperback $40.00
  • Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, Second Edition

    Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, Second Edition

    Jeffrey M. Wooldridge

    The second edition of a comprehensive state-of-the-art graduate level text on microeconometric methods, substantially revised and updated.

    The second edition of this acclaimed graduate text provides a unified treatment of two methods used in contemporary econometric research, cross section and data panel methods. By focusing on assumptions that can be given behavioral content, the book maintains an appropriate level of rigor while emphasizing intuitive thinking. The analysis covers both linear and nonlinear models, including models with dynamics and/or individual heterogeneity. In addition to general estimation frameworks (particular methods of moments and maximum likelihood), specific linear and nonlinear methods are covered in detail, including probit and logit models and their multivariate, Tobit models, models for count data, censored and missing data schemes, causal (or treatment) effects, and duration analysis.

    Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data was the first graduate econometrics text to focus on microeconomic data structures, allowing assumptions to be separated into population and sampling assumptions. This second edition has been substantially updated and revised. Improvements include a broader class of models for missing data problems; more detailed treatment of cluster problems, an important topic for empirical researchers; expanded discussion of "generalized instrumental variables" (GIV) estimation; new coverage (based on the author's own recent research) of inverse probability weighting; a more complete framework for estimating treatment effects with panel data, and a firmly established link between econometric approaches to nonlinear panel data and the "generalized estimating equation" literature popular in statistics and other fields. New attention is given to explaining when particular econometric methods can be applied; the goal is not only to tell readers what does work, but why certain "obvious" procedures do not. The numerous included exercises, both theoretical and computer-based, allow the reader to extend methods covered in the text and discover new insights.

    • Hardcover $115.00
  • Solutions Manual and Supplementary Materials for Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data

    Solutions Manual and Supplementary Materials for Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data

    Jeffrey M. Wooldridge

    Solutions manual for a widely used graduate econometrics text.

    This is the essential companion to Jeffrey Wooldridge's widely-used graduate text Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data (MIT Press, 2001). Already established as a leading graduate econometrics text, the book offers an intuitive yet rigorous treatment of two methods used in econometric research, cross section and panel data techniques. The numerous end-of-chapter problems are an important component of the book, encouraging the student to use the analytical tools presented in the text. This manual contains answers to selected problems, new examples, and supplementary materials designed by the author. Users of the textbook will find the manual a necessary adjunct to the book.

    • Paperback $30.00
  • Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data

    Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data

    Jeffrey M. Wooldridge

    A comprehensive state-of-the-art text on microeconometric methods.

    This graduate text provides an intuitive but rigorous treatment of contemporary methods used in microeconometric research. The book makes clear that applied microeconometrics is about the estimation of marginal and treatment effects, and that parametric estimation is simply a means to this end. It also clarifies the distinction between causality and statistical association. The book focuses specifically on cross section and panel data methods. Population assumptions are stated separately from sampling assumptions, leading to simple statements as well as to important insights. The unified approach to linear and nonlinear models and to cross section and panel data enables straightforward coverage of more advanced methods. The numerous end-of-chapter problems are an important component of the book. Some problems contain important points not fully described in the text, and others cover new ideas that can be analyzed using tools presented in the current and previous chapters. Several problems require the use of the data sets located at the author's website.

    • Hardcover $82.00